NOISE ENGINEERING DESIGN

When hearing protection and administrative controls cannot be employed to reduce noise exposures, EI’s engineering team assists our industrial clients in the identification and design of noise engineering controls.  Engineering controls for excessive noise can be developed for isolated pieces of manufacturing equipment or entire industrial process lines. Initial steps require performing sounds level facility surveys and personnel noise dosimeter monitoring of manufacturing personnel by experienced industrial hygienists. Noise monitoring results are utilized to determine specific sources of excessive noise, as well as the mechanism of sound generation/propagation emitted by the excessive noise source.  Multiple sources of noise will subsequently be “rank ordered”, which will allow for a range of possible engineering controls, typically addressing the loudest sound sources first.  EI’s professionals segregate excessive noise sources into two distinct classes, vibrational noise and noise turbulence.

Once all specific noise sources are identified, EI utilizes the following logical approach to determine the optimal systems to reduce/control excessive noise:

  1. Substitution of equipment (fundamental first step)
  2. Categorization of source into vibrational noise and turbulence based noise
  3. Reduction of driving forces which cause excessive noise
    a. Decreasing machine speed
    b. Maintaining dynamic balance
    c. Provide vibrational isolation
    d. Increasing impact duration, while reducing the force of impact
  4. Reduce response of vibrating surfaces
  5. Reduce area of vibrating surfaces
  6. Reorienting directional noise sources
  7. Reduction in velocity of fluid flow (air ejection systems, valves, vents and piping)
  8. Provide sound absorption alternatives
  9. Design and installation of equipment and personnel noise enclosures

Let EI’s team of industrial hygienists and engineers work collaboratively to identify and provide cost-effective engineering solutions reduce exposure of your workforce to excessive noise.

IN NEED OF OUR SERVICES? 

EI’s commitment to service has been amply demonstrated on past projects.  Yet again, this commitment has been clearly demonstrated by nimble agility of short notice staff scheduling.  The dedicated professionals of The EI Group have exceeded our expectations.

 

Steven Pond, CPG

Associate, Schnabel Engineering

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The face of occupational health and safety is changing. Many manufacturing facilities have realized that having a paramedic on-site has many benefits. Paramedics today are stepping into the occupational healthh setting by staffing on-site clinics and providing medical care to employees, completing Job Hazard Analyses (JHA’s) and finding new and innovative ways to manage a safe work environment.

OSHA’s Stance on the Use of Noise Cancelling Headphones in the Workplace

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A colleague recently received a pair of noise cancelling headphones as a gift during the holiday season. In an office surrounded by the buzz of phones, printers, and watercooler discussions of the latest binge-worthy shows; I decided to mask my jealousy by researching...

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Problems with Non-Compliance?

I am sure that your occupational health and safety programs always run smoothly, with never a hiccup.  No one questions the policies in place, your employees follow procedures to the “letter of the law” always do what they are supposed to, right?  Unfortunately, we all know this is certainly not always the case and as an occupational health consultant, I am often asked what should a company do about non-compliance.

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As expected, OSHA announced 2018’s Top 10 Violations this past week and the only surprise took the #10 spot. This past year, 1,536 violations citing CFR 29 126.102 were recorded—that’s the standard for Personal Protective & Lifesaving Equipment that focuses on eye and face protection. 

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Ensuring Standards of Practice and Execution Match

All of our occupational health programs are perfect, right?  We have OSHA Standards to follow, policies written and Standards of Practice (SOPs) in place, and everyone is doing what they are supposed to, right? Or, are they? 

Protecting the Hearing-Impaired Worker

Protecting the Hearing-Impaired Worker

On average, 22 million workers are exposed to hazardous noise in the workplace each year. To protect these workers from developing hearing loss due to these exposures, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) requires implementation of hearing conservation programs for individuals exposed to hazardous noise levels and requires companies to supply their employees with a suitable variety of hearing protectors.

Why Your Clinic Should Switch to Insert Earphones

Why Your Clinic Should Switch to Insert Earphones

In a previous blog, a brief history was provided concerning the 30-year effort by hearing conservation professionals to obtain approval from OSHA in 2013 for the use of insert earphones rather than supra-aural headphones. For audiometric testing, Audiologists have used insert earphones in clinical practice for decades. Why should your clinic switch to using insert earphones?

RELATED SERVICES

HEARING CONSERVATION

SAFETY ENGINEERING

NOISE MONITORING

TRAINING COURSES